Ad Fontes

Politics, Theology and Christian Humanism


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Óscar Romero on sin and the liberation struggle

Oscar RomeroTomorrow, 24 March, will be the thirtieth anniversary of the assassination of Archbishop Óscar Romero of San Salvador. San Romero is remembered for his radical faith that compelled him to take a stand against the US-backed right-wing military government of El Salvador. Although often associated with liberation theology, the Marxist theological movement that began in Latin America, Romero rose through the ranks of the church as a staunch conservative, demanding obedience to the church hierarchy and the government, and being openly critical of Marxist priests and the guerilla fighters.

However, it was the assassination in 1977 of Romero’s friend, the outspoken Jesuit liberation theologian Rutilio Grande García, who set up base church communities (Christian worker’s communes) in the poorest districts of the country, that was something of an epiphany to him, and foreshadowing of his own death. Romero said, “If they have killed him for doing what he did, then I too have to walk the same path”. Óscar Romero began to speak out against the assassinations and in defence of the poor. He remained critical of the Marxist guerillas, but grew in sympathy for liberation theology.

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A Marxist Mothering Sunday

Grave of Karl Marx

Monument at the grave of Karl Marx, Highgate Cemetery, London.

Last Sunday was Mothering Sunday (the third Sunday before Easter). Being 14 March, it was also the 127th anniversary of the death of Karl Marx.

After a very busy Sunday morning with a packed out church, we went on a Northern Line pilgrimage to Highgate Cemetery, getting to Marx’s tombstone just after the moment of his death — 14:45 — made famous by Friedrich Engels graveside remembrance

“On the 14th of March, at a quarter to three in the afternoon, the greatest living thinker ceased to think. He had been left alone for scarcely two minutes, and when we came back we found him in his armchair, peacefully gone to sleep — but forever.”

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