Ad Fontes

Politics, Theology and Christian Humanism


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Is UKIP the BNP for the middle class?

Last night there were hustings of parliamentary candidates for our two local constituencies. I wasn’t able to go, but a friend showed me the programme afterwards. Alongside candidates from the three major parties were two UKIP candidates. It seemed normal to everyone that there were UKIP candidates on the platform, not arousing the controversy that having BNP candidates there would have created.

It seems UKIP’s main electoral tool is elector ignorance, with a bit of media fearmongering to boot. When I ask people what UKIP stands for, everyone says they are against the EU, and when pressed add that they’re probably anti-immigration too. For those who would never dream of voting for the fascist BNP, UKIP seems to them an attractive alternative to the major parties, but I’m sure they are not aware of what UKIP stands for.

UKIP’s immigration policy is against the UN Convention on Refugees, and so both UKIP and the BNP state that they would withdraw the UK from it. They would also repeal the Human Rights Act in order to deliver the harsher forms of ‘justice’ they relish. Any lover of liberty should start to hear alarm bells when a political group advocates the rolling back of our human rights.

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Building the resistance: reflections on the LRC conference

Labour Representation Committee banner

Labour Representation Committee banner

Yesterday, I attended my very first conference as a member of the Labour Representation Committee. I was a little apprehensive that, after deciding on the LRC for my political home, I would come face to face with the mass membership and realise that I wasn’t in the right place. I am glad to report that my comrades have proved my fears unfounded. In other sections of the Left, the address ‘comrade’ can be so loaded, even to becoming a weapon, but here I felt genuine warmth whenever that word was used.

Tony Benn, veteran inspiration of the Labour Left, opened the conference with a short, well-received speech. He spoke of the historical LRC, set up to give voice to the Labour Movement in politics, firstly through the Liberal Party, and then going on to found the Labour Party. He pointed out that after New Labour’s divorce from the grassroots Labour Movement, the present LRC is just as needed to bring our voice into politics. Finally, he restated one of his key political themes that, if there can be full employment and no shortage of bombs and tanks in the Second World War, why can’t we put that energy and indefatigability into winning the peace. It was good to see Tony Benn after his recent operation, although looking a little weak of body, still strong in spirit.

From the outset, the fault lines within the LRC were clearly visible — between the membership who were in the Labour Party, keeping the faith though battered and bruised by New Labour bullying, and the membership outside of Labour in the disaffiliated unions and the various small Communist and Trotskyist tendencies that affiliate to the LRC. However, the fault lines are publicly cherished, and the open, democratic nature of the LRC is designed to act as a bridge between these groups, working together for democratic socialism. As with any radical political meeting, there were two people who demonstrate that they feel radicalism is an excuse for nuttiness: a ranting ex-Trot and an absurd Posadist. They were met with a polite but firm response from conference: sit down and shut up if you have nothing sensible to say.

A good representation from the CWU were at conference, and received resounding support for their defensive strike action at Royal Mail. Industrial issues for journalists and civil servants were also brought up as resolutions. The RMT brought a resolution in support of the People’s Charter, which was supported. Please do visit their website, read the charter and sign it; it could be a useful symbol for unity in the Left and opposition to the neoliberal policies of the mainstream parties. Continue reading


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The C of E does wrong again: RBS, public money and funding evil

The Church of England means well, it really does; it just finds it very difficult not to put its own interests first. Who could blame us really; that’s what most of us do. Well, we do have this nagging expectation that the Church does the Right Thing. I know that historically we’ve done all sorts of bad things, like burning Catholics, encouraging Puritans to move to America, providing reconnaissance and population control for British colonialism, and generally siding with establishment against the grievances of the poor and needy. But, we’re really sorry: Archbishop Vincent is our buddy now, we have a black Archbishop of York and mission churches on council estates. See, we’re really nice now!

Well, no. We haven’t learnt our lesson. The blessed C of E believes that it is necessary to fund your vicar’s stipend and pension by investing in war and pollution: we simply have to do it! That’s why the Church of England has £200 million invested in the oil industry. We also do some mining and out-of-town retail parks, having shifted funds to the latter from the badly performing market in social housing. We also have £8.4 million invested in a nice Scottish bank called RBS, making us a major shareholder alongside the UK Treasury who now own a 70% stake in the banking group due to the recent,  sudden conclusion that the bank’s money wasn’t terribly real and it could do with some very real tax money to help it out. Continue reading