Ad Fontes

Politics, Theology and Christian Humanism


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Traditionalists welcome change

The news is that Pope Benedict has opened a path for ‘traditionalist’ Anglicans (read ‘misogynists’) to join the Catholic Church without getting too Catholic about it (read priests keeping their wives and their ‘Anglo-Tridentine’ liturgy). He has issued an Apostolic Constitution to provide for Personal Ordinariates for disaffected Anglicans. These mean that Anglicans can join the Catholic Church while retaining their rites and uses, much in the same way Eastern Catholics retain various Greek, Arabic, Syriac, Armenian liturgies).

My first reaction is: please go, we’ve had enough! The Church of England has done all it can and more than it should to keep discontents happy. A few of them have even been gainfully employed as flying bishops. The move towards recognising the equality of the gifts of the Holy Spirit in women has been painfully slow due to the foot dragging of these old boys. Their arguments are roadblocks rather than litanies of reason, their actions are Pharisaic rather than Christlike. Just like the last Anglican exodus, I’m sure the Catholic parishes will not be best pleased with the quality of the new intake. So, if you would like to leave, please form an orderly queue. Continue reading


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Why I’m an Anglican

The main reason why I’m an Anglican is because I’m English, and being C of E is like a national default (at least it used to be, in the days before opting out of organised religion became the new default). That’s it, mundane and simple. As with so many things in life, the original reason for a decision is often pretty mundane. The reasoning and calculated arguments are added later. This is partly a natural evaluation that we do, but it is also an attempt not to look too stupid. We can go to great lengths to justify all sorts of decisions that, in truth, originated by whim of circumstance. Sometimes it’s liberating to be honest about our reasons. I chose my theological college because they served a nice cheeseboard when I visited, and I couldn’t afford the time or train fare to look elsewhere.

This is not to say that the later reasoning is a cover up. It can be, but it is still important to justify why we are where we are. I find this reasoning increasingly important as I find very good reasons not to be Anglican. I hate the Church of England’s ties with Establishment — Elizabeth Windsor as ‘Supreme Governor’, bishops sitting in the House of Lords, and the general societal superiority this tends to create (varieties of exceptionalism and classism). I hate its history of collusion with British empire building. I hate its lack of courage and self-knowledge and the blinkered pettiness it breeds. Continue reading


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The Anglican Communion as imagined community

Frank Turner, Professor of History at Yale, has a wonderfully insightful article on the Anglican Communion at Episcopal Café. His thesis is that a group of Anglicans, mainly bishops, have sought to shape the various independent Anglican provinces into a global ecclesiastical community over the past two decades.

Turner calls Benedict Anderson’s concept of imagined communities into play here. The bare bones of Anderson’s theory is that a nation is a socially constructed community based on various presumptions of shared attributes: language, religion, skin colour, culture &c. The question it raises is why do I cheer on an athlete, whom I have never met and with whom I have little in common, at the Olympics just because her uniform says she is British? The question it raises is why it is considered a high ideal to die for ‘queen and country’.

Of course, social constructs are not unreal, but they are perceived realities: nationality is no absolute thing. It is fascinating seeing a ‘nation’ being built over the last score of years, but understanding the Anglican Communion as imagined community does much to help us understand the pressures it is under at this time.

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